FAQ

What are some other things I can do for maintenance on my Bloomer Trailer?

Apply grease as needed to your vehicle gooseneck ball. This will help your trailer ride smoothly at the gooseneck ball connection and help with premature wear or damage to the trailer coupler. Also make sure the coupler adjustment pin and set bolts are tight and in good condition. Pulling the rubber floor mats and cleaning out the trailer floor in the horse compartment is necessary to keep integrity of the floor boards and structure. Floor mats should be pulled especially after extended trips and before storing the trailer for an extended amount of time. Using shavings can help extend the time between pulling the floor mats to clean. Check the seal around the doors and windows of your trailer. These seals need to be checked to make sure no water is entering into your trailer. Check the sealant on top of your trailer roof. Areas to look at include the perimeter of the roof and around any object that is penetrating the roof skin. Like your home, these seals and sealants need to be checked often.

I do the recommended service on my brakes and bearings, my tire pressure is correct before each trip, I drive at posted speed limits, but I’m still getting unusual wear on my tires and my brakes and bearings are wearing are giving me problems?

This could be a problem resulting from coupler height. Adjustment in coupler height allows the trailer to ride level with the ground. If the trailer is not riding level, one of the axles with its bearings, brakes, and tires will be carrying more weight than they are designed and rated for. Adjusting coupler height and/or blocking axles will help correct unlevel trailer towing.

What are some important things I need to know about my brakes and tires on my Bloomer Trailer?

Bloomer Trailers uses the best components available and if they are maintained properly, should give you years of satisfaction. Here are a few items that should be checked often. What to Check: Make sure your brakes on your trailer are working properly before every trip. Listen for the electric/hydraulic actuator to make a loud humming sound while applying brakes. Visually check to see that there is no brake fluid leaking from the brake lines, fittings, brake calipers and check the fluid level in the electric/hydraulic actuator. Brake pads and bearings should be checked and replaced if needed every 12,000 miles. If your trailer is used in high traffic areas or steep inclines where brakes are applied more frequently, your brake pads will wear out faster and need to be checked more often. If the gain on your brake controller is set at a higher position, your brake pads will wear out faster and need to be checked more often. The axle bearings we use are packed in grease from our supplier. Letting a trailer sit for months will allow the grease to settle in the bottom of the bearings and could develop flat spots on the non-greased portion of the bearings causing them to wear out faster or freeze up. This can lead to running a wheel off and damaging the brake components and axle spindle. When the spindle gets damaged, the entire axle will have to be replaced. Make sure your tires are in good condition before each trip. Correct air pressure is critical to making your tires last. The tire pressure should be checked before each trip and adjusted for correct air pressure. There is no need to adjust your air pressure during your trip as the tires heat up and gain air pressure. The tires are made to handle the rise in tire temperature and will adjust back to normal when not in use. For every 5 PSI the tire is under the recommended tire pressure, that tire loses 500 pounds of carrying capacity which can result in excessive wear on the edge of the tires and tire failure. Each tire we use also has a speed rating that indicates the tire carrying capacity at different speed. This means that the faster you travel, the tires decrease in carrying capacity. See chart below.

 

Tandem axles

TIRE CAPACITY

Each

51 – 65 mph

66 – 70 mph

71 – 75 mph

10 PLYMICH

 3,042#

 12,168#

 11,682#

 10,708#

16 PLYMICHXTA

 4,805#

 19,220#

 18,452#

 16,914#

18 PLYMICHXTA 2 ENERGY

 6,005#

 24,020#

 23,060#

 21,138#

Triple axles

51 – 65 mph

66 – 70 mph

71 – 75 mph

10 PLYMICH

 3,042#

 18,252#

 17,523#

 16,062#

16 PLYMICHXTA

 4,805#

 28,830#

 27,678#

 25,371#

18 PLYMICHXTA 2 ENERGY

 6,005#

 36,030#

 34,590#

 31,707#

What this all means is if your trailer tires are underinflated and your traveling at speeds over posted limits you have a better chance of having bad tire wear or even worse…a tire blow out.

How is my Bloomer Trailer wired and what color wires go where?

Bloomer Trailers uses the following wire color code with a 7-way plug.
Red wire – hot wire (12 volts)
Green wire – right turn signal
Black wire – brake wire
White wire – ground wire
Yellow wire – left turn signal
Brown wire – tail marker/ running lights
Blue wire – optional additional hot wire located on the center pin. This is used when your vehicle has two hot wires.
See wiring diagram for location and purpose of each wire:

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How do I troubleshoot an issue with my brakes?

If your Bloomer Trailer is equipped with an electric/hydraulic disc brakes there are a few common reasons they might not be working;

No power at the 1 o’clock position on the vehicle 7-way plug. This position on the vehicle 7-way plug must have 12 volts for the electric/hydraulic actuator to work.

What to Check:

  • Bad fuse on the vehicle designated for the trailer charge/hotwire.
  • Is there a charge/hot wire installed.
  • Is there a good connection between the vehicle and trailer 7-way connection.

No power at the 5 o’clock position on the vehicle 7-way plug when the brakes are applied.

What to Check:

  • Bad fuse on the vehicle designated for the trailer brakes.
  • If your vehicle has a factory built in brake controller, check the vehicle manual to verify if it is compatible with electric/hydraulic disc brake systems. In some cases, an aftermarket brake controller may need to be installed.

Low/no fluid in the trailer brake actuator.

What to Check:

  • Inspect hydraulic brake line on trailer for leaks.
  • Inspect brake calipers for leaks.
  • Check the fluid in the electric/hydraulic actuator often.